A new generation of medical students is headed your way, and they’re a little geeky. They’re products of a new American Medical Association program called “Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium (ACME).” Their mission is to train new physicians with EHRs, pop health and value-based care in mind.
The first ACME graduating class includes students from 32 medical schools, who are now ready to take their tech savvy to hospitals and practices nationwide.

  • A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
  • Eastern Virginia Medical School
  • Emory University School of Medicine
  • Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
  • Harvard Medical School
  • Morehouse School of Medicine
  • Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education/City College of New York
  • Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University
  • Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago
  • University of Connecticut School of Medicine
  • University of Nebraska College of Medicine
  • University of North Carolina School of Medicine
  • University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin
  • University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine
  • University of Utah School of Medicine
  • University of Washington School of Medicine

ACME was launched back in 2013 with the goal of educating students in the technology, techniques and value-based philosophies that are defining healthcare in the 21st Century. The program responds to an immediate need: a recent poll had shown that only 64 percent of medical school programs even allowed students to get hands-on experience with electronic health records.

This past year AMA partnered with the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine to launch an EHR training program for med students: the EHR Clinical Learning Platform, billed as the first of its kind, uses actual data from patients.

ACME started in 2013. At the time, a recent poll showed that only 64 percent of medical school programs even allowed students to get hands-on experience with electronic health records.

Not learning how to document in the EHR during university training “comparable to a physician graduating from medical school without learning how to properly use a stethoscope,” said the AMA’s Susan Skochelak, M.D.
This past year AMA partnered with the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine to the EHR Clinical Learning Platform. Billed as the first of its kind, the platform uses actual data from patients at Indianapolis-based Eskenazi Health, which enable students to care for virtual patients as they familiarize themselves with EHR workflows.

Beyond the teaching EHR system, other innovations from the consortium include competency-based programs, curricula allowing students to be totally immersed within the health care system from day one of medical school, training in physician leadership, education in team care skills, and curricula aimed at achieving health equity and increasing diversity in the physician workforce.

Now, five years since it was first dreamed up, ACME’s first students are graduating from the Consortium’s 32 schools.
The real question is, can they program a VCR?